Ubuntu: Where is .bashrc?



Question:

I feel stupid asking, but I can't seem to find the answer to this anywhere. I'm trying to follow these instructions to edit my bash prompt, but there is no .bashrc in either my user directory (~/.bashrc), or in my home directory, or in the main file system directory.

There is no .bashrc in /etc/ (there is a bash.bashrc, however).

Do I create a .bashrc file in my user or home directory? Is there a better, more recent set of instructions for modifying the bash prompt?


Solution:1

Don't forget it is a hidden file inside your home directory (you would not be the first to do a ls -l and thinking it is not there).

Do a:

ls -la ~/ | more  

There should be a .bashrc on the first page. If not just create it with:

vi ~/.bashrc  

and add in the lines you need to add into it.

Permissions of my .bashrc are:

-rw-r--r--  1 discworld discworld  3330 Mar 10 16:03 .bashrc  

(chmod 644 .bashrc to make it rw r r).


Solution:2

User specific, hidden by default.

~/.bashrc  

If not there simply create one.

System wide:

/etc/bash.bashrc  


Solution:3

There is a .bashrc in every user's home folder (99.99% of the time) as well as one system-wide (which I don't know the location of in Ubuntu).

The quickest way to access it is nano ~/.bashrc from a terminal (replace nano with whatever you like to use).

If this is not present in a user's home folder the system-wide .bashrc is used as a fallback as it is loaded before the user's file. You could simply copy and paste it (with root permissions of course), but a .bashrc is not entirely essential (it may be required to make things work. I haven't found out) at a user level as it mostly overrides the system-wide one with user-specific tweaks. You could write your own though.

The main components for that users may tweak are PS1 (the Bash prompt defaults to display user@localhost:pwd $) and aliases as well as setting a color prompt and maybe PS2 (busy state message).


Solution:4

It is hidden because of the . the filename starts with. List it with

ls -al  

or enable "Show hidden files" under the view menu in nautilus (Ctrl-H will also do the trick).

You can edit it with your favorite text editor from your home directory e.g. cd to go to your home directory then:

emacs .bashrc  


Solution:5

If .bashrc is not in your home folder, even after you list the hidden files, you can copy it from:

/etc/skel/.bashrc  


Solution:6

Use gedit ~/.bashrc, it will allow you to modify ~/.bashrc using gedit.


Solution:7

if not in home directory, you can just copy from /etc/bash.bashrc, and make it source for your terminal, by typing in your terminal source .bashrc from your home directory after copying.


Solution:8

Use nano ~/.bashrc to open and edit the .bashrc file. (This will create the file if it does not yet exist)


Solution:9

If you use encryption and work from the command line you might not see it as one need to mount the real home-dir first (in contrast to in the graphical UI where this is done automaticallu) by the command:

ecryptfs-mount-private  

(I had the same question and stumbled upon this question; but found my answer in the readme instead)


Note:If u also have question or solution just comment us below or mail us on toontricks1994@gmail.com
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