Ubuntu: Virtualbox “system is not currently set up to build kernel modules”



Question:

I'm trying to install Virtualbox on my Ubuntu 16.04. When I try to open it, it gives me an error that tells me to run sudo /sbin/vboxconfig. Running this command results in the following output:

vboxdrv.sh: Building VirtualBox kernel modules.       This system is not currently set up to build kernel modules (system                  extensions).       Running the following commands should set the system up correctly:      apt-get install linux-headers-4.2.0-35-generic  (The last command may fail if your system is not fully updated.)    apt-get install linux-headers-generic  vboxdrv.sh: failed: Look at /var/log/vbox-install.log to find out what went wrong.  This system is not currently set up to build kernel modules (system extensions).  Running the following commands should set the system up correctly:      apt-get install linux-headers-4.2.0-35-generic  (The last command may fail if your system is not fully updated.)    apt-get install linux-headers-generic    There were problems setting up VirtualBox.  To re-start the set-up process, run    /sbin/vboxconfig  as root.  

The suggested steps don't work on my machine. It says that the package is obsolete. The only available header packages are 4.4.0 packages. Running uname -r gives me version 4.2.0 though.

Any ideas how to fix this?

Output of cat /etc/lsb-release:

DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu  DISTRIB_RELEASE=16.04  DISTRIB_CODENAME=xenial  DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS"  

Output of sudo apt install linux-generic:

Reading package lists... Done  Building dependency tree         Reading state information... Done  linux-generic is already the newest version (4.4.0.36.38).  0 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.  

Output of cat /etc/default/grub:

# If you change this file, run 'update-grub' afterwards to update  # /boot/grub/grub.cfg.  # For full documentation of the options in this file, see:  #   info -f grub -n 'Simple configuration'    GRUB_DEFAULT="                                                               Windows 10"  #GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT="0"  GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET="true"  GRUB_TIMEOUT="5"  GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR="`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian`"  GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash"  GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=""    # Uncomment to enable BadRAM filtering, modify to suit your needs  # This works with Linux (no patch required) and with any kernel that obtains  # the memory map information from GRUB (GNU Mach, kernel of FreeBSD ...)  #GRUB_BADRAM="0x01234567,0xfefefefe,0x89abcdef,0xefefefef"    # Uncomment to disable graphical terminal (grub-pc only)  #GRUB_TERMINAL="console"    # The resolution used on graphical terminal  # note that you can use only modes which your graphic card supports via VBE  # you can see them in real GRUB with the command `vbeinfo'  #GRUB_GFXMODE="640x480"    # Uncomment if you don't want GRUB to pass "root=UUID=xxx" parameter to Linux  #GRUB_DISABLE_LINUX_UUID="true"    # Uncomment to disable generation of recovery mode menu entries  #GRUB_DISABLE_RECOVERY="true"    # Uncomment to get a beep at grub start  #GRUB_INIT_TUNE="480 440 1"    export GRUB_COLOR_NORMAL="green/black"  export GRUB_COLOR_HIGHLIGHT="light-green/black"  export GRUB_MENU_PICTURE="/home/user/grub/maxresdefault.jpg"  GRUB_SAVEDEFAULT="false"  


Solution:1

You have a spoiled /etc/default/grub file.

Fix the line

GRUB_DEFAULT="                                                               Windows 10"  

to

GRUB_DEFAULT=0  

Then remove

GRUB_SAVEDEFAULT="false"  

and run

sudo update-grub  

Then reboot.


Note:If u also have question or solution just comment us below or mail us on toontricks1994@gmail.com
Previous
Next Post »