Ubuntu: How can I mount a SMB share exactly like Nautilus does it?



Question:

I have an...interesting problem. You see, I have a SMB share on a network that I would like to mount locally. When I use Nautilus to mount it, everything works perfectly. However, I need to configure the system to run without a GUI, meaning that I can't use Nautilus and instead must create an fstab entry or something similar.

However, when I try to mount the share using the following fstab entry:

//ip.address.goes.here/sharename /path/to/mountpoint cifs  username=user,password=pass,iocharset=utf8,sec=ntlm 0 0  

The share mounts, but the permissions are seriously messed up and prevent me from doing anything.

I know that the share can be mounted properly, as Nautilus does it. My question is, how does Nautilus do it?


Solution:1

Nautilus uses the Gnome Virtual File System (gvfs) to mount devices. In a system that's already running a gvfsd daemon you can initiate a mount manually using the gvfs-mount command e.g.

gvfs-mount smb://ip.address.goes.here/sharename  

which should cause a link to the share to appear in the Nautilus sidebar; the actual mountpoint should appear in the filesystem at /run/user/<UID>/gvfs (or $HOME/.gvfs on earlier versions).

I'm not sure that will be an option in a truly headless environment: I suggest you create a new question detailing your exact issues with the fstab method.


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